Discussion:
When SNCF did food
(too old to reply)
Theo
2017-07-03 22:30:41 UTC
Permalink
Another world...
http://www.nytimes.com/1986/01/19/travel/riding-the-nouvelle-premiere.html?pagewanted=all
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-07-03 22:53:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Theo
Another world...
http://www.nytimes.com/1986/01/19/travel/riding-the-nouvelle-premiere.html?pagewanted=all
Do VIA Rail Canada and Amtrak also do food?
Graeme Wall
2017-07-04 07:02:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Theo
Another world...
http://www.nytimes.com/1986/01/19/travel/riding-the-nouvelle-premiere.html?pagewanted=all
Do VIA Rail Canada and Amtrak also do food?
Yes
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
John Levine
2017-07-04 17:37:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Theo
http://www.nytimes.com/1986/01/19/travel/riding-the-nouvelle-premiere.html?pagewanted=all
Do VIA Rail Canada and Amtrak also do food?
Yes
Amfood tends to sandwiches and microwave pizza on short distance trains,
standard US stuff like steak, chicken, and pasta on long distance trains.
Most long distance trains still have seated diners with waiter service.

The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
beer:

https://www.amtrak.com/ccurl/171/386/Acela-Express-First-Class-Menus-0417.pdf

In Canada, the medium distance trains have sandwiches and tray meals,
with an emphasis on Canadian ingredients, e.g. Montreal bagels and
Niagara wine. The sleepers on the transcontinental Canadian are as
good as it gets:

http://www.viarail.ca/sites/all/files/media/pdfs/menus/111135807-13_Menu-Diner_SD15103_EN.pdf
tim...
2017-07-04 19:27:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Levine
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Theo
http://www.nytimes.com/1986/01/19/travel/riding-the-nouvelle-premiere.html?pagewanted=all
Do VIA Rail Canada and Amtrak also do food?
Yes
Amfood tends to sandwiches and microwave pizza on short distance trains,
standard US stuff like steak, chicken, and pasta on long distance trains.
Most long distance trains still have seated diners with waiter service.
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is

tim
John Levine
2017-07-04 21:52:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by John Levine
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is
I dunno, they're both bland pale lagers made in vast quantities by AB
InBev.

Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.

R's,
John
Nobody
2017-07-04 23:17:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Levine
Post by tim...
Post by John Levine
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is
I dunno, they're both bland pale lagers made in vast quantities by AB
InBev.
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
R's,
John
It's the "Artois" attachment which adds the cachet...
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-07-05 23:38:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nobody
Post by John Levine
Post by tim...
Post by John Levine
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is
I dunno, they're both bland pale lagers made in vast quantities by AB
InBev.
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
R's,
John
It's the "Artois" attachment which adds the cachet...
Wifebeater?!
Graeme Wall
2017-07-05 15:03:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Levine
Post by tim...
Post by John Levine
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is
I dunno, they're both bland pale lagers made in vast quantities by AB
InBev.
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
In Canada it was Boddingtons!
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Jeremy Double
2017-07-06 07:42:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by John Levine
Post by tim...
Post by John Levine
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is
I dunno, they're both bland pale lagers made in vast quantities by AB
InBev.
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
In Canada it was Boddingtons!
I've had draft Boddingtons in Michigan...
--
Jeremy Double
Graeme Wall
2017-07-06 12:28:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeremy Double
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by John Levine
Post by tim...
Post by John Levine
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is
I dunno, they're both bland pale lagers made in vast quantities by AB
InBev.
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
In Canada it was Boddingtons!
I've had draft Boddingtons in Michigan...
I've seen it in New York but drank Brooklyn Brewery regardless.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-07-09 21:54:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Jeremy Double
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by John Levine
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
In Canada it was Boddingtons!
I've had draft Boddingtons in Michigan...
I've seen it in New York but drank Brooklyn Brewery regardless.
Which as I recall was rather palatable.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
Graeme Wall
2017-07-10 07:00:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by Jeremy Double
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by John Levine
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
In Canada it was Boddingtons!
I've had draft Boddingtons in Michigan...
I've seen it in New York but drank Brooklyn Brewery regardless.
Which as I recall was rather palatable.
Certainly was.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-07-05 23:37:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Levine
Post by tim...
Post by John Levine
The first class section of the Acela express in the northeast has some
culinary pretentions, but keep in mind that they think Stella is a premium
compared to "bud" surely it is
I dunno, they're both bland pale lagers made in vast quantities by AB
InBev.
Amtrak also stock some reasonable beers but somehow Stella has managed
to brand itself in the US as sophisticated and upmarket
???

Wifebeater? Really?

Although once when I was at a restaurant in the United States, and I
asked what beers they had, the waiter pronounced Artois as "Artoyz."
Post by John Levine
as opposed to
the choice of Flemish lager louts.
Can't have that in the United States, that's "foreign" beer and thus
highly suspicious. Probably made by Mexicans and Moslems.
John Levine
2017-07-06 19:23:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
as opposed to the choice of Flemish lager louts.
Can't have that in the United States, that's "foreign" beer and thus
highly suspicious. Probably made by Mexicans and Moslems.
It's even worse than that -- it's made by Brazilians.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-07-06 21:21:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Levine
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
as opposed to the choice of Flemish lager louts.
Can't have that in the United States, that's "foreign" beer and thus
highly suspicious. Probably made by Mexicans and Moslems.
It's even worse than that -- it's made by Brazilians.
Brazilians? Who the f* are they?!

"We don't who they are, we don't know where they came from ... "
Steve Fitzgerald
2017-07-09 21:52:35 UTC
Permalink
In message <ojgjnv$9s6$***@gal.iecc.com>, John Levine <***@iecc.com>
writes
Post by John Levine
In Canada, the medium distance trains have sandwiches and tray meals,
with an emphasis on Canadian ingredients, e.g. Montreal bagels and
Niagara wine. The sleepers on the transcontinental Canadian are as
http://www.viarail.ca/sites/all/files/media/pdfs/menus/111135807-13_Menu
-Diner_SD15103_EN.pdf
And when we used them Toronto to Montreal they'd run out of food; a ham
sandwich (just the one!) was all that was available.
--
Steve Fitzgerald has now left the building.
You will find him in London's Docklands, E16, UK
(please use the reply to address for email)
bob
2017-07-10 01:29:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
writes
Post by John Levine
In Canada, the medium distance trains have sandwiches and tray meals,
with an emphasis on Canadian ingredients, e.g. Montreal bagels and
Niagara wine. The sleepers on the transcontinental Canadian are as
http://www.viarail.ca/sites/all/files/media/pdfs/menus/111135807-13_Menu
-Diner_SD15103_EN.pdf
And when we used them Toronto to Montreal they'd run out of food; a ham
sandwich (just the one!) was all that was available.
Did they build a busway?

Robin
Roland Perry
2017-07-10 10:02:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by John Levine
In Canada, the medium distance trains have sandwiches and tray meals,
with an emphasis on Canadian ingredients, e.g. Montreal bagels and
Niagara wine. The sleepers on the transcontinental Canadian are as
http://www.viarail.ca/sites/all/files/media/pdfs/menus/111135807-13_Menu
-Diner_SD15103_EN.pdf
And when we used them Toronto to Montreal they'd run out of food; a ham
sandwich (just the one!) was all that was available.
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy the
bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was sufficiently
empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip, that I suspect
they'd failed to stock it up at all.
--
Roland Perry
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-07-10 14:49:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by John Levine
In Canada, the medium distance trains have sandwiches and tray meals,
with an emphasis on Canadian ingredients, e.g. Montreal bagels and
Niagara wine. The sleepers on the transcontinental Canadian are as
http://www.viarail.ca/sites/all/files/media/pdfs/menus/111135807-13_Menu
-Diner_SD15103_EN.pdf
And when we used them Toronto to Montreal they'd run out of food; a
ham sandwich (just the one!) was all that was available.
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy the
bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was sufficiently
empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip, that I suspect
they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I would
imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
U***@web.de
2017-07-10 14:58:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy the
bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was sufficiently
empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip, that I suspect
they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I would
imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
Such things do happen also in German trains. Lack of time to refill.

They do not accept lack of time for getting a train ticket.

Regards, ULF
Graeme Wall
2017-07-10 15:21:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by John Levine
In Canada, the medium distance trains have sandwiches and tray
meals, with an emphasis on Canadian ingredients, e.g. Montreal
bagels and Niagara wine. The sleepers on the transcontinental
http://www.viarail.ca/sites/all/files/media/pdfs/menus/111135807-13_Menu
-Diner_SD15103_EN.pdf
And when we used them Toronto to Montreal they'd run out of food; a
ham sandwich (just the one!) was all that was available.
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy the
bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was sufficiently
empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip, that I suspect
they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I would
imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
I suspect they get stocked at London for the round trip.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Martin Coffee
2017-07-10 16:07:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Steve Fitzgerald
Post by John Levine
In Canada, the medium distance trains have sandwiches and tray
meals, with an emphasis on Canadian ingredients, e.g. Montreal
bagels and Niagara wine. The sleepers on the transcontinental
http://www.viarail.ca/sites/all/files/media/pdfs/menus/111135807-13_Menu
-Diner_SD15103_EN.pdf
And when we used them Toronto to Montreal they'd run out of food; a
ham sandwich (just the one!) was all that was available.
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy
the bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was
sufficiently empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip, that
I suspect they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I would
imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
I suspect they get stocked at London for the round trip.
I've been on the ultimate or penultimate departure from Brussels a
number of times and they were very often sold out or very low on food.
My suspicion is that there is no replenishment facilities at Brussels
station. I wonder if the replenishment facilities for the E*s are
solely at the depots so they cannot be re-stocked during the day?
Roland Perry
2017-07-10 16:52:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin Coffee
I've been on the ultimate or penultimate departure from Brussels a
number of times and they were very often sold out or very low on food.
My suspicion is that there is no replenishment facilities at Brussels
station. I wonder if the replenishment facilities for the E*s are
solely at the depots so they cannot be re-stocked during the day?
I know they do replenish some of the food (maybe only the Premier stuff
bundled with the fare) at St Pancras because they have the unfortunate
habit of parking the delivery trollies so as to maximally obstruct the
platform for inbound passengers trying to get along the platform having
just got off the train.
--
Roland Perry
Graeme Wall
2017-07-10 17:05:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Martin Coffee
I've been on the ultimate or penultimate departure from Brussels a
number of times and they were very often sold out or very low on food.
My suspicion is that there is no replenishment facilities at Brussels
station. I wonder if the replenishment facilities for the E*s are
solely at the depots so they cannot be re-stocked during the day?
I know they do replenish some of the food (maybe only the Premier stuff
bundled with the fare) at St Pancras because they have the unfortunate
habit of parking the delivery trollies so as to maximally obstruct the
platform for inbound passengers trying to get along the platform having
just got off the train.
Thinking about it, St Pancras is the only place I have seen E* catering
trolleys.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Recliner
2017-07-12 18:03:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Martin Coffee
I've been on the ultimate or penultimate departure from Brussels a
number of times and they were very often sold out or very low on food.
My suspicion is that there is no replenishment facilities at Brussels
station. I wonder if the replenishment facilities for the E*s are
solely at the depots so they cannot be re-stocked during the day?
I know they do replenish some of the food (maybe only the Premier stuff
bundled with the fare) at St Pancras because they have the unfortunate
habit of parking the delivery trollies so as to maximally obstruct the
platform for inbound passengers trying to get along the platform having
just got off the train.
I'm posting this on a refurbished e300, using the free WiFi, from deep
under the Chunnel, on a service from GdN to SPI. I can confirm that all the
branded goods on my tray (not just the wines) were French.

As an aside, this is my first trip on a refurbished e300, and very nice it
is too. It looks new, and is of course much smoother and quieter than the
rough riding e320 Velaros.

Roland Perry
2017-07-10 16:01:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy
the bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was
sufficiently empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip,
that I suspect they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I
would imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
I suspect they get stocked at London for the round trip.
Given that it's operated by SNCF, I'd expect the reverse.
--
Roland Perry
Recliner
2017-07-10 16:27:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy
the bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was
sufficiently empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip,
that I suspect they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I
would imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
I suspect they get stocked at London for the round trip.
Given that it's operated by SNCF, I'd expect the reverse.
Judging by the brands, the food on trains originating from St Pancras
certainly seems to be UK-sourced. I'll be on a e* train from Paris in a
couple of days and will see what brands arrive on my tray in Standard
Premier.
Roland Perry
2017-07-10 16:45:23 UTC
Permalink
In message
<1013026303.521396104.451136.recliner.ng-***@news.eternal-sept
ember.org>, at 16:27:07 on Mon, 10 Jul 2017, Recliner
Post by Recliner
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy
the bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was
sufficiently empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip,
that I suspect they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I
would imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
I suspect they get stocked at London for the round trip.
Given that it's operated by SNCF, I'd expect the reverse.
Judging by the brands, the food on trains originating from St Pancras
certainly seems to be UK-sourced. I'll be on a e* train from Paris in a
couple of days and will see what brands arrive on my tray in Standard
Premier.
I was in economy.
--
Roland Perry
Graeme Wall
2017-07-10 17:03:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Graeme Wall
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Roland Perry
The last time I travelled from Brussels to London on E* in Economy
the bar-thingy had run out of food. All food. The train was
sufficiently empty, and I buying sufficiently early in the trip,
that I suspect they'd failed to stock it up at all.
Why do they allow that to happen? Don't they take inventories? I
would imagine that there must exist some pretty decent inventorising
programmes that would indicate where and when such sundries need to go.
I suspect they get stocked at London for the round trip.
Given that it's operated by SNCF, I'd expect the reverse.
Brussels is not in France so no different for SNCF. London is the
common terminal for all E* services so actually makes sense to base
their catering services there.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
c***@anywhere.com
2017-07-04 18:00:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Theo
Another world...
http://www.nytimes.com/1986/01/19/travel/riding-the-nouvelle-premiere.html?pagewanted=all
I have fond memories of an excellent lunch (rabbit, as I recall) being
served on train 283 between Paris and Brussels, in 1984 or
thereabouts.

No supplement payable on that train, and second class passengers (like
me) welcome in the restaurant car.

Chris.
U***@web.de
2017-07-04 07:16:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Theo
Another world...
http://www.nytimes.com/1986/01/19/travel/riding-the-nouvelle-premiere.html?pagewanted=all
Another food, but still SNCF: http://medias.sncf.com/sncfcom/pdf/restauration/Carte_Bar_TGV.pdf

Regards, ULF
Theo
2017-07-04 23:36:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by U***@web.de
Another food, but still SNCF: http://medias.sncf.com/sncfcom/pdf/restauration/Carte_Bar_TGV.pdf
I suspect some in France will disagree.

Theo
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