Discussion:
OT: Harz Railway photos
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Recliner
2019-08-27 16:01:55 UTC
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The recent discussion about having professional staff on preserved steam
railways, reminded me of my latest trip on the HSB.

This is a full time, professional railway network that runs 365 days a
year, providing both tourist and local public transport services. It runs
steam trains (mainly on the touristy sections), diesel railbuses and bimode
tram-trains (yes, long before Sheffield) on to the Nordhausen streets. The
three main termini all connect to DB standard gauge lines. Part of the
network was originally part of the standard gauge network, but was
transferred to the HSB and relaid as metre gauge.

On a given day, there might be as many as eight different steam locos
hauling trains, and these are big, complex engines, such as 2-10-2Ts and
Mallets. And, yes, it has a short on-street section in Wernigerode.

My pictures show that the staff are often quite young, no older than on DB,
and certainly not the retired old blokes who provide most of the drivers
and firemen on Britsh steam railways. It has a full apprenticeship
programme to train future staff.

<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157710568123063>
Jeremy Double
2019-08-28 05:48:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Recliner
The recent discussion about having professional staff on preserved steam
railways, reminded me of my latest trip on the HSB.
This is a full time, professional railway network that runs 365 days a
year, providing both tourist and local public transport services. It runs
steam trains (mainly on the touristy sections), diesel railbuses and bimode
tram-trains (yes, long before Sheffield) on to the Nordhausen streets. The
three main termini all connect to DB standard gauge lines. Part of the
network was originally part of the standard gauge network, but was
transferred to the HSB and relaid as metre gauge.
On a given day, there might be as many as eight different steam locos
hauling trains, and these are big, complex engines, such as 2-10-2Ts and
Mallets. And, yes, it has a short on-street section in Wernigerode.
My pictures show that the staff are often quite young, no older than on DB,
and certainly not the retired old blokes who provide most of the drivers
and firemen on Britsh steam railways. It has a full apprenticeship
programme to train future staff.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157710568123063>
The Harz system is also fun in the winter:
https://flickr.com/photos/***@N08/sets/72157603884218253

https://flickr.com/photos/***@N08/sets/72157603880899960

https://flickr.com/photos/***@N08/sets/72157603838237957

https://flickr.com/photos/***@N08/sets/72157612012431034
--
Jeremy Double
Recliner
2019-08-28 08:32:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Recliner
The recent discussion about having professional staff on preserved steam
railways, reminded me of my latest trip on the HSB.
This is a full time, professional railway network that runs 365 days a
year, providing both tourist and local public transport services. It runs
steam trains (mainly on the touristy sections), diesel railbuses and bimode
tram-trains (yes, long before Sheffield) on to the Nordhausen streets. The
three main termini all connect to DB standard gauge lines. Part of the
network was originally part of the standard gauge network, but was
transferred to the HSB and relaid as metre gauge.
On a given day, there might be as many as eight different steam locos
hauling trains, and these are big, complex engines, such as 2-10-2Ts and
Mallets. And, yes, it has a short on-street section in Wernigerode.
My pictures show that the staff are often quite young, no older than on DB,
and certainly not the retired old blokes who provide most of the drivers
and firemen on Britsh steam railways. It has a full apprenticeship
programme to train future staff.
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/recliner/albums/72157710568123063>
Yes, you've certainly had a variety of weather conditions on the Brocken!

I've been up it twice in the winter: on the first trip, I fell on the ice
sheet at the summit and injured myself, needing to be met by an ambulance
in Wernigerode; on the second, the weather was even worse than in your last
set, with near zero visibility at the peak, so hardly anyone even got off
the train. So I thought I'd try a summer visit, and I'm glad I did.
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