Discussion:
translation technical term "Transportleistung"
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Tadej Brezina
2013-08-30 18:37:24 UTC
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Dear newsgroup readers!

Got another translation question.
"Transportleistung" can be used for passenger or goods transport and
usually has the unit passenger-kilometers or tonne-kilometers.
What is it in English?
www.linguee.de offers many options: haulage capacity, transport
capacity, transport performance, transport volume, transport power, ...?

Thanks in advance and
best regards from Vienna
T+
--
"Und obwohl der Mensch selbst der größte Räuber ist, den die Welt
gesehen hat, neigt er dazu, alle anderen Räuber zu verurteilen."
<Eugene P. Odum zum Raub in der Ökologie, Ökologie S.254>
--
(Laptop brezta2)
Peter Able
2013-08-30 19:16:14 UTC
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Post by Tadej Brezina
xpost: mtra, ur, mtre
fup2: mtre
Dear newsgroup readers!
Got another translation question.
"Transportleistung" can be used for passenger or goods transport and
usually has the unit passenger-kilometers or tonne-kilometers.
What is it in English?
www.linguee.de offers many options: haulage capacity, transport capacity,
transport performance, transport volume, transport power, ...?
Thanks in advance and
best regards from Vienna
T+
--
"Und obwohl der Mensch selbst der größte Räuber ist, den die Welt gesehen
hat, neigt er dazu, alle anderen Räuber zu verurteilen."
<Eugene P. Odum zum Raub in der Ökologie, Ökologie S.254>
--
(Laptop brezta2)
Capacity is probably the closest single word. We tend not to have "concept"
words in English. Often enough we'll just refer to the particular
measurement unit as in:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rail-passenger-miles

and hope that the context makes it clear whether we are discussing it
terms of usage, maximum possible, revenue or suitability of particular
vehicles/trainsets.

HTH

PA
Stephen Sprunk
2013-08-31 19:35:15 UTC
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Post by Tadej Brezina
Got another translation question.
"Transportleistung" can be used for passenger or goods transport and
usually has the unit passenger-kilometers or tonne-kilometers.
What is it in English?
www.linguee.de offers many options: haulage capacity, transport
capacity, transport performance, transport volume, transport power, ...?
Any of those might be appropriate, depending on exactly what you are
measuring. In particular, you might be describing how much you could
transport (capacity) vs. how much you did transport (volume). The
disparity is often described via a term such as "loading", which is the
ratio of volume to capacity. There are also generally different terms
for passenger vs. freight, since there is no meaningful way to translate
from one to the other. If you need a generic term, e.g. a title for a
chapter that discusses both, transport(ation) would work.

Perhaps if you gave examples, we could better help you find the right
words to use?

S
--
Stephen Sprunk "God does not play dice." --Albert Einstein
CCIE #3723 "God is an inveterate gambler, and He throws the
K5SSS dice at every possible opportunity." --Stephen Hawking
Tadej Brezina
2013-09-01 13:34:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen Sprunk
Post by Tadej Brezina
Got another translation question.
"Transportleistung" can be used for passenger or goods transport and
usually has the unit passenger-kilometers or tonne-kilometers.
What is it in English?
www.linguee.de offers many options: haulage capacity, transport
capacity, transport performance, transport volume, transport power, ...?
Any of those might be appropriate, depending on exactly what you are
measuring. In particular, you might be describing how much you could
transport (capacity) vs. how much you did transport (volume). The
disparity is often described via a term such as "loading", which is the
ratio of volume to capacity. There are also generally different terms
for passenger vs. freight, since there is no meaningful way to translate
from one to the other. If you need a generic term, e.g. a title for a
chapter that discusses both, transport(ation) would work.
Perhaps if you gave examples, we could better help you find the right
words to use?
S
Thanks Stephen and Peter for the hints so far.

I'd like to use it in a journal article on national passenger railroad
statistics.
So it's passenger-kilometers and it is what has actually been
transported by the railroads and not what they may be able to do: sum of
all passenger trip lengths.

I thought that 'volume' is mainly (solely?) used for passenger numbers
instead of passenger-kilometers!?

Thanks
T+
--
"Und obwohl der Mensch selbst der größte Räuber ist, den die Welt
gesehen hat, neigt er dazu, alle anderen Räuber zu verurteilen."
<Eugene P. Odum zum Raub in der Ökologie, Ökologie S.254>
--
(Laptop brezta2)
Peter Able
2013-09-01 17:54:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tadej Brezina
I thought that 'volume' is mainly (solely?) used for passenger numbers
instead of passenger-kilometers!?
It depends what you are trying to convey.

For a single station, passenger numbers may be useful as a way of showing
that more - or less - staff, are needed at that station.

For a single train, passenger numbers may be useful as a way of showing that
more - or less - coaches are needed in that train.

For a particular route, passenger-kilometres, or tonne-kilometres may be a
better indication of the value of the route.

PA
Stephen Sprunk
2013-09-01 20:19:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tadej Brezina
Post by Stephen Sprunk
Any of those might be appropriate, depending on exactly what you
are measuring. In particular, you might be describing how much you
could transport (capacity) vs. how much you did transport (volume).
The disparity is often described via a term such as "loading",
which is the ratio of volume to capacity. There are also generally
different terms for passenger vs. freight, since there is no
meaningful way to translate from one to the other. If you need a
generic term, e.g. a title for a chapter that discusses both,
transport(ation) would work.
Perhaps if you gave examples, we could better help you find the
right words to use?
Thanks Stephen and Peter for the hints so far.
I'd like to use it in a journal article on national passenger
railroad statistics. So it's passenger-kilometers and it is what has
actually been transported by the railroads and not what they may be
able to do: sum of all passenger trip lengths.
I thought that 'volume' is mainly (solely?) used for passenger
numbers instead of passenger-kilometers!?
It could be either; context will usually imply which was meant if the
units used are absent.

As Peter pointed out, we tend to avoid conceptual terms in favor of
units anyway; that avoids ambiguity by specifying exactly what was
measured. For instance, see this table titled "US Passenger-Miles":
http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/publications/national_transportation_statistics/html/table_01_40.html

S
--
Stephen Sprunk "God does not play dice." --Albert Einstein
CCIE #3723 "God is an inveterate gambler, and He throws the
K5SSS dice at every possible opportunity." --Stephen Hawking
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